Lifelong Learning Institute at Virginia Tech
  Lifelong Learning Institute at Virginia Tech

Lifelong Learning Institute at Virginia Tech

HOME
ABOUT
EVENTS
Travel Opportunities
COURSES
Locations
Instructors
Register
MEMBERSHIP
Policies
Register
Auditing College Courses
VOLUNTEER
Course Proposal Form
CONTACT

Courses

Fall Term Begins October 1, 2018
Catalogs Available Beginning August 20
Registration Available August 27

Most classes are 1 ½ hours, one day per week, for 3 or 6 weeks

Preview Fall 2018 Offerings:


View Course Descriptions
- or -
Download an updated Catalog: Check back!


Also check our events page for information about scheduled upcoming events.


Asian couple looking at computer

Archives

Course Descriptions

MONDAY

October 1 - 29, 2018

Finding Hidden Treasures in the Archives

Course #:100290-001
Time:Monday, 9:00 - 10:30 a.m.
Dates: 5 weeks: Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29
Location: Corporate Research Center, 1880 Pratt Dr., Suite 2018
Class Limit: 25
Cost: $35
Instructor(s): Kira Dietz

This course will introduce participants to Special Collections in the library at Virginia Tech. Each week we will take a look at books and manuscripts from the collection to explore a larger theme and discuss how these items depict, represent, and exemplify the theme in different ways. We'll talk about issues in the archives field, how those issues influence what archivists do, and their effect on the historical record. This will be a hands-on, eyes-on course with participants being able to see and handle materials from Special Collections.

CLASS SESSIONS

  1. Introduction to Special Collections and Archives: who we are; what we do and why we do it; what we collect
  2. War and Conflict: the home fronts and the battlefields of the Civil War and World Wars I and II
  3. Hidden and Silent Voices: documenting and discussing underrepresented communities
  4. History of Science: a crash course in engineering, flight, aerospace, and technological marvels
  5. Society and Pop Culture: celebration through song, advertising, food and drink, and fun locations

Register for Courses

October 1-29, 2018

Perspective Drawing Salvador Dali Style!

Course #: 100290-002
Time: Monday, 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Dates: 5 weeks: Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29
Location: Blacksburg Community Center, Community Room
Class Limit: 15
Cost: $35
Instructor(s): Linda Olin

Learn how to create a sense of depth in drawing objects using the basic principles of perspective drawing. Students will learn how to create the illusion of three-dimensional objects on a two dimensional surface.

TOPICS

  • Using one and two vanishing points to create 3-dimensional objects and show depth in a drawing
  • Creating a fantasy drawing using the principles of perspective drawing
  • Appreciating the art of Salvador Dali, Leonardo DaVinci, and other masters

SUPPLIES
A sketchbook (18" x 24"), no. 2 pencils, eraser, pencil sharpener, triangle, and an 18" - 24" ruler. Optional supplies: fine point black Sharpie marker and colored pencils.

Register for Courses

October 1 - November 5, 2018

Investigating the Kennedy Assassination: What Really Happened?

Course #: 100290-003
Time: Monday, 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Dates: 6 weeks: Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, Nov. 5
Location: Virginia Tech Public Safety Building, Room 153
Class Limit: 25
Cost: $35
Instructor(s): Dr. Tod Burke, Dr. Stephen Owen

On November 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas. Lee Harvey Oswald was identified as the likely assassin of both President Kennedy and Dallas police officer, J. D. Tippit. Two days later, Oswald was killed by Dallas nightclub owner, Jack Ruby. Four U.S. government commissions have investigated the Kennedy assassination, yet controversy remains. Many people feel that they do not yet have the truth about what happened, leading to beliefs in a conspiracy and/or cover-up. In this class, we will study the Kennedy assassination and related events, primarily through the lens of criminal investigation.

TOPICS

  • The political, social, and economic dynamics of the 1960s that shaped the presidency of John F. Kennedy, and the unique and controversial political dynamics of Dallas
  • The planned presidential trip to Texas, including Dallas, as well as the security precautions that were put in place
  • Eyewitness (and earwitness) testimonies and how they shaped (and continue to shape) investigative hypotheses
  • The official narrative of the case and supporting evidence, as assembled by the Warren Commission, as well as conspiracy allegations and the work of other investigative commissions
  • The impacts of the assassination on public opinions and public behaviors and the enduring interest in the case from historians and the popular media

Register for Courses

October 1 - November 5, 2018

Conversational Spanish

Course #: 100290-004
Time: Monday, 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Dates: 6 weeks: Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, Nov. 5
Location:
Class Limit: 10
Cost: $35
Instructor(s): Libby Calvera

This class is for individuals who studied Spanish, however much and however long ago, but who have not had much if any opportunity to use it recently. In-class activities are designed to get participants to converse in Spanish.

Register for Courses

October 1 - November 5, 2018

"Looking Through a Glass Onion": Reconsidering the Beatles

Course #: 100290-005
Time: Monday, 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Dates: 6 weeks: Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, Nov. 5
Location: Hillel at Virginia Tech
Class Limit: 35
Cost: $35
Instructor(s): Joe Scallorns

Never in popular music has a group's work been as celebrated—and scrutinized—as that of the Beatles. Although the group's recording output spans a mere seven years, they are the best-selling band in musical history. They're arguably one of the most influential too—as Rolling Stone critic Paul Evans observed, "Theirs is the final, great consensus in popular music. . . Not liking them is as perverse as not liking the sun."

Over fifty years after their first appearance on American television, how have they continued to endure? We'll look at archival footage, read critical essays and profiles, and listen to a cross-section of their catalogue. We'll endeavor to better understand their historical, cultural, and music impact.

CLASS SESSIONS

  1. "Yeah, Yeah, Yeah": The Rise of Beatlemania (1962-1964)
  2. "Turn Off Your Mind": Into the Studio (1965-1966)
  3. "I am the Walrus": The Beatles, Psychedelia, and Apple (1967-1968)
  4. "Right is only half of what's wrong": The End (1969-1970)
  5. "It Ain't Easy": Beatles Go Solo (1971-1980)
  6. Screening of A Hard Day's Night

Register for Courses

October 1-15, 2018

You Can Cook Chinese, Too

Course #: 100290-006
Time: Monday, 1:00 - 3:30 p.m.
Dates: 3 weeks: Oct. 1, 8, 15
Location: Instructor's home
Class Limit: 12
Cost: $35
Materials fee: $30
Instructor(s): Joe Ivers

Over the 3 classes you will learn how to prepare 10 dishes:

  1. Shredded Pork in Peking Sauce, Beef and Broccoli, and Stir-Fried Napa Cabbage and Rice
  2. Pot Stickers, Shallow Fried Fish, Egg Fried Rice, and Egg Splash
  3. Sichuan Beef, Chinese Chicken Barbecue, and Velvet Cream of Corn/Crab Soup

Register for Courses

October 1 - November 5, 2018

Wine Appreciation

Course #: 100290-007
Time: Monday, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m.
Dates: 6 weeks: Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, Nov. 5
Location: Vintage Cellar
Class Limit: 25
Cost: $35
Wine fee: $100
Instructor(s): Randall Horst

This class will explore a different type of wine each week, considering country of origin, specific areas/ wineries, type of grape, blends, and vintages. We will taste five or six different wines from all over the world each week to develop our palates and acquaint our noses with the aromas of wine. If you attended in Fall 2016 or 2017, join us again—we'll be tasting new wines this fall.

The wine fee for this course is $100. Mail a separate check for the wine fee only to Vintage Cellar, 1338 South Main Street, Blacksburg, VA 24060. Note on your check that it is payment for the LLI Wine Appreciation course. Credit card payment also accepted in advance (call 540-953-2675) or at the first class session.

Register for Courses

TUESDAY

October 2 - November 6, 2018

Sampler

Course #: 100290-008
Time: Tuesday, 9:00 - 10:15 a.m.
Dates: 6 weeks: Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, Nov. 6
Location: Warm Hearth Village Center
Class Limit: 75
Cost: $35

This engaging sampler course treats participants to a wide range of speakers and topics—something different each week.

October 2. The FBI and American Religion

How has the Federal Bureau of Investigation viewed religion in the United States? Does religion shield groups from suspicion? Is religion often a reason for the FBI to investigate various communities? Are some religious groups treated differently than others? This talk will explain the FBI's relationship to American religious groups since its beginnings in the early 1900s.

Instructor(s): Sylvester Johnson

October 9. From Wytheville to the White House

Learn about Edith Bolling Galt Wilson from her birth in Wytheville, to her life as First Lady from 1915 to 1921, and her last visit to Wytheville. Then plan to join LLI on the November 7 field trip to the Edith Bolling Wilson Home, Wytheville. (See Special Events.) There will be a book signing after the talk.

Instructor(s): Joyce Covey and Farron Smith

October 16. A Professional Photographer Visits France

How does a professional "see" things differently? Travel to France (vicariously!) with Susan and view the country through her lens.

Instructor(s): Susan Lockwood

October 23. George C. Marshall and The Marshall Plan at 70

2018 marks the 70th anniversary of the Marshall Plan that rebuilt Western Europe following WWII. Marshall, in his second term as U.S. Secretary of State, won the Nobel Prize in 1953 for his efforts. There will be a book signing after the talk.

Instructor(s): Mary Skutt

October 30. The Radford Ordnance Works 1938-1946

It's in our backyard but do you know much about the start of the military's munitions manufacturing plant? Why was that land chosen? How did 23,000 people turn fertile farmland into an enormous powder manufacturing "city" in just 8 months?

Instructor(s): Dennis Kitts

November 6. What We Still Don't Know About the Future of Automated Vehicles

With roadway fatalities on the rise, we look to new innovative solutions to make our roadways safer. Advancements in connected and automated vehicles may be the turning point. Before we can realize the safety benefits, there are challenges to overcome. This presentation will introduce some of these challenges from the different viewpoints of everyday citizens.

Instructor(s): Andy Schaudt

Register for Courses

October 2 - November 6, 2018

TED Talks

Course #: 100290-009
Time:Tuesday, 10:45 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Dates: 6 weeks: Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, Nov. 6
Location: VT Public Safety Building, Room 153
Class Limit: 25
Cost: $35
Instructor(s): Dean Spader

TED talks are short, well-prepared, understandable presentations by remarkable, innovative, articulate persons on over 2,500 topics in almost every area of life. We'll watch and discuss three different talks in each class session, chosen initially by the instructor and then by volunteer class members who select a TED talk of interest and then initiate discussion. This is a participation class, drawing on the life experiences, knowledge, interests, and expertise of participants in the class. TED talks are an exceptional way to broaden your exposure to ideas and initiatives you may never have considered before, and to join others in lively conversation.

Want to see what kinds of talks we might choose? Visit www.TED.com. TED talks feature "ideas worth spreading."

Register for Courses

October 2-23, 2018

Scenes from the History of Virginia Tech, Part Two

Course #: 100290-010
Time: Tuesday, 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Dates: 4 weeks: Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23
Location: VT Public Safety Building, Room 153
Class Limit: 32
Cost: $35
Instructor(s): Peter Wallenstein

Stories of individual people can illuminate the rich saga of how Virginia Tech has empowered its students—and how, in turn, their presence shaped the institution over the past century and a half. Three examples: One of VPI's first female students (1921) was a daughter of one of the school's first cadets (1872). Two friends from Hong Kong made their way to VPI in the 1920s, the school's first ethnic Chinese graduates. And it took multiple villages to bring the pioneering black students to campus in the 1950s. We'll explore these and other stories emerging from archival research.

Register for Courses

October 9 - November 6, 2018

Preserving Memories—Organizing Photographs and Creating Scrapbooks

Course #: 100290-011
Time: Tuesday, 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Dates: 5 weeks: Oct. 9, 16, 23, 30, Nov. 6
Location: Blacksburg Presbyterian Church, Hatcher Conference Room
Class Limit: 15
Cost: $35
Instructor(s): Carolyn Meier, Vera Kidd

Are you overwhelmed with stacks of photographs? Would you like to organize and preserve them, but don't know where to start? This course will provide some simple tools to get you started organizing and getting those memories into albums. This will be a very hands-on course, starting from organizing to layouts, journaling, and creating albums of memories. We will introduce and discuss the topic of the day, but the goal will be for participants to spend the majority of the time working on their own projects.

CLASS SESSIONS

  1. Organizing: chronologically, by person, by place, by event or by a combination of topics
  2. Power layouts and journaling: planning a layout, defining the story of the photos. What was the story behind the photos? Always tell the "who, what, where and when" of the photos!
  3. Page decoration and tool introduction: techniques for matting photographs based on color, theme and shape, and using borders and titles.
  4. Work session: Participants will work on their albums with instructor guidance.
  5. Digital options available for scrapbooking.

MATERIALS
Photographs to organize, a blank album and pages, scissors, and adhesive. Instructors will bring scrapbook papers, punches, border makers, and colored pens. Advice will be offered in the first session on types of albums to purchase and specific qualities to look for in albums, adhesives, and papers.

Register for Courses

George Eliot's Middlemarch

Course #: 100290-012
Time: Tuesday, 1:30 - 3:00 p.m.
Dates: 6 weeks: Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, Nov. 6
Location: VT Public Safety Building, Room 155
Class Limit: 15
Cost: $35
Instructor(s): Michael Squires

The greatest novel of the nineteenth century is Middlemarch, which George Eliot published in 1872. We'll ask what makes it a masterpiece, but we'll also look at Eliot's childhood, her break from religious piety, her partnership with George Henry Lewes (he was already married), and her reasons for changing her name from Mary Ann Evans. Film clips will illuminate the book's dialogue, scenery, and construction.

REQUIRED READING
George Eliot, Middlemarch.

Register for Courses

WEDNESDAY

October 3 -31, 2018

Moby Dick—An Unconventional Classic

Course #: 100290-013
Time: Wednesday, 9:00 - 10:30 a.m.
Dates: 5 weeks: Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31
Location: VT Public Safety Building, Room 155
Class Limit: 15
Cost: $35
Instructor(s): Jeff Saperstein

Rarely a day goes by without a political or cultural or media figure making a reference to "the white whale." Though considered a classic today, Moby Dick received mixed reviews when it was first published in 1851. It wasn't until 30 years after Herman Melville's death that many readers came to appreciate its humor, its complexity, its poetry, and its strange mix of moods and genres.

The course will explore this rich novel in the context of Melville's life and career as well as its relevance today. "Contained in the pages of Moby-Dick is nothing less than the genetic code of America: all the promises, problems, conflicts and ideas that... continue to drive this country's ever-contentious march into the future." (Nathaniel Philbrick)

CLASS SESSIONS

  1. There's something about Herman: introductions and expectations; overview of Melville's life and work; why read Moby Dick?
  2. Setting sail (chapters 2-23): whaling culture; Ishmael-Queequeg; Melville's humor
  3. Ship of state (chapters 24-57): Ahab; mixed genres
  4. Into the Pacific (chapters 58-96): processing the whale; Melville and Hawthorne
  5. Chasing Melville (chapters 97-end): overall experience and assessment; further readings

REQUIRED READING
Herman Melville, Moby Dick, unabridged edition. Recommended: Penguin Classics edition, introduction by Andrew Delbanco. (2002, ISBN 978- 0142437247). Please bring your Moby Dick text to the first class meeting.

Register for Courses

October 3 -31, 2018

Learn Duplicate Bridge

Course #: 100290-014
Time: Wednesday, 9:00 - 10:30 a.m.
Dates: 5 weeks: Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31
Location: Blacksburg Community Center, Game Room
Class Limit: 24 (minimum 8)
Cost: $35
Instructor(s): Susan Bricken, Richard Rio

A host of people across the globe would say that Duplicate Bridge is the greatest game ever devised. Others consider it to be more of an addiction. Over the last 20 years, the game has changed dramatically to provide more variety and more competition on every hand. This is a friendly, easy, no-nonsense way for you to learn. Duplicate Bridge is aerobic exercise for your brain and provides plenty of laughter for the heart. These lessons are geared towards people of all skill levels. You do not need a partner to attend these classes.

The 5-week course starts at the beginning and builds in complexity. Topics include an introduction to Bridge. You will be playing hands from the first lesson on. Bidding, play of the hand, and defense follow. Finally, you will learn Bridge techniques to improve your game.

REQUIRED READING
Jim Ricker, Beginning Bridge Using 2 Over 1. (Diamond Books Publishing, 2014, ISBN 978-1495115738; about $25)

Register for Courses

September 26 - October 17, 2018

Modern Turkey: Experiment in Democracy

Course #: # 100290-015
Time: Wednesday, 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Dates: 4 weeks: Sept. 26, Oct. 3, 10, 17
Location: German Club Manor, Southgate Drive
Class Limit: 20
Cost: $50
Instructor(s): William Ochsenwald

The Turkish Republic is a Muslim-majority country with a population of 80 million that is often seen as a bridge between Europe and the Middle East. Since World War II, Turkish politics and society have become more democratic and prosperous, but with frequent military interventions into politics and currently a growing Islamic authoritarianism. This course will analyze the historical development of democracy in Turkey, its strengths and weaknesses, and the reasons behind the authoritarian trend in the 2010s

CLASS SESSIONS

  1. Devastation and Dictatorship: 1923 to 1950
  2. Democracy Interrupted: 1950 to 1980
  3. Democracy Expands: 1980 to 2010
  4. Authoritarianism Victorious: 2010 to 2018

RECOMMENDED READING
Simon A. Waldman and Emre Caliskan, The New Turkey and Its Discontents (Oxford University Press, 2017), paperback ISBN: 978-0190668372

Register for Courses

October 3 - November 7, 2018

Poetry: Words that Sing and Dance for a Living

Course #: 100290-016
Time: Wednesday, 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Dates: 6 weeks: Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, Nov. 7
Location: Hillel at Virginia Tech
Class Limit: 32
Cost: $35
Instructor(s): Britton Gildersleeve

The vast majority of Americans don't read poetry, not even one poem annually! Which says something about its popularity, right? If you don't like it, you have a lot of company. But almost all children LOVE poetry—so somewhere between elementary school and adulthood we lose that love.

Come back to poetry with an open mind and learn how to read it for pleasure (NOT a grade! NOT a paper!), how to understand it (it's not an intelligence test!), how to have fun with it. And trust me—it can be a lot of fun! Read some classics (Shakespeare, ee cummings, Emily Dickinson), but also some less familiar names, like Lucille Clifton, B. H. Fairchild, and Donald Justice. Come join a group of folks just like you, and let's explore words that sing and dance for a living.

REQUIRED READING
Robert Pinsky & Maggie Dietz, eds. An Invitation to Poetry. 2004. ISBN 978-0393058765

Stephen Dunning, Naomi Shihab Nye, et al., eds. Reflections on a Gift of Watermelon Pickle. 2nd edition, 1997. ISBN 978-0673294234

Both anthologies are available used from Amazon.

Register for Courses

October 3 - 17, 2018

Basics of Digital Photography

Course #: 100290-017
Time: Wednesday, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m.
Dates: 3 weeks: Oct. 3, 10, 17
Location: Hillel at Virginia Tech
Class Limit: 15
Cost: $35
Instructor(s): Derley Aguilar

This course will teach participants basic image composition, editing, sharing, and storing digital photographs.

TOPICS

  • Getting to know your camera
  • How and why—techniques for shot composition and exposure
  • Show and tell—critique of photographs
  • Resources for editing photos
  • Resources for sharing and storing images

MATERIALS
Participants may use their own simple point-andshoot camera or camera phone. A laptop or tablet may be useful for the segment on photo editing, but it is not required.

Register for Courses

THURSDAY

October 4 November 15, 2018

Global Changes IV: Exploring Change from Many Perspectives

Course #: # 100290-018
Time: Thursday, 9:30 - 11:00 a.m.
Dates: 6 weeks: Oct. 4, 11, 18, 25, Nov. 1, 15 (no class Nov 8)
Location: Corporate Research Center, 1880 Pratt Dr., Suite 2018
Class Limit: 36
Cost: $35

This course is the fourth in a series on global change. Enrollment in prior classes is not a requirement for registration.

CLASS SESSIONS

October 4. Applying Conservation Social Science to Understand Human Decisions and Address Habitat Loss

Ashley Dayer, Assistant Professor, Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech

Solutions to most of our global change challenges require humans taking action. In order to effectively engage people (from private landowners to policymakers to citizens), it is critical that we understand human behavior and its drivers (e.g., social context, values, attitudes, motivations). Dr. Dayer will present us with background on how the social sciences are advancing the understanding of human dimensions of global change. She will focus on examples of understanding human decisions related to habitat loss in the face of sea level rise in the East, drought in the West, and agricultural production in the Great Plains.

October 11. Wildlife, Disease, and Climate Change: Lessons from Amphibians

Lisa Belden, Professor, Biological Sciences, Virginia Tech

Amphibian populations globally have declined dramatically in the last several decades. We will discuss what is known about the causes of these amphibians' declines and how complex global threats, including climate change and disease, can interact to impact wildlife.

October 18. How Sensitive is the Antarctic Ice Sheet to Climate Change and What Does it Mean for Sea Level Change? How Can Earth History Research Help Us Prepare for Future Climate Change?

Brian Romans, Associate Professor, Geosciences, Virginia Tech

The West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS), which holds the equivalent of 10 feet of sea-level rise, is melting at a faster rate than other ice sheets. Some pressing questions in climate science include: How quickly could the WAIS melt? How stable is the WAIS in response to warming? Dr. Romans will share insights from his sea-going expedition in January- February 2018 that recovered Ross Sea sediment cores to study how the WAIS responded to climate change historically. He will discuss the value of looking into Earth's past to help us understand what is happening now and in the future.

October 25. Tilapia Farming at the Crossroads of Food Security and Biodiversity Conservation in Africa

Emmanuel Frimpong, Associate Professor, Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech

This presentation analyzes a conundrum involving the Genetically Improved Farm Tilapia (GIFT), aquaculture development, and biodiversity conservation in Africa. The GIFT tilapia has literally become Africa's gift to the world, driving global farmed fish production, especially in Asia. However, African farmers are largely prevented from farming this tilapia strain due to concerns that farming the selectively bred tilapia on the continent will "pollute" native tilapia genetic diversity. The talk will examine who gains and who loses from this decision from the ethical, economic, and biological conservation perspectives.

November 1. Community-Engaged Research in Urban and Rural Communities in the Deep South: Extreme Heat Events and Health Outcomes

Julia Gohlke, Associate Professor, Population Health Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech

This talk will define heatwave trends in the Southeast and the influence of urban and rural landscapes on neighborhoodlevel heat exposure. We will also discuss heatwave-health outcome associations using spatial epidemiology methods. Results of community-engaged research on the socioeconomic and cultural contexts for prioritizing climate change and other environmental health issues in an urban versus a rural setting in Alabama will be presented and discussed in the context of developing climate change adaptation strategies.

November 15. Valuing Environmental Services and Amenities—An Economic Perspective (and, No, "Priceless" is Not the Correct Answer, Ever…)

Klaus Moeltner, Professor, Agriculture and Applied Economics, Virginia Tech

Non-market valuation is the economics field that estimates the dollar-valued benefits of environmental amenities and services, such as clean air and water, preservation of endangered species, averting/combatting invasive species, recreational opportunities, ecosystem health, lowering risk or impact of natural disasters, etc. -basically environmental outcomes that humans value and may pay for, but that are not bought or sold in established markets. Dr. Moeltner will show how survey methods and housing market data can be used to determine these values, and how they are used in broader benefit-cost analyses. Case studies will include coastal flood risk, mountain pine beetle infestation, wetland ecosystem services, and power outages.

Register for Courses

October 4 - November 15, 2018

FUNdamentals of Plant Propagation

Course #: 100290-019
Time: Thursday, 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Dates: 6 weeks: Oct. 4, 11, 18, Nov. 1, 8, 15 (no class Oct. 25)
Location: VT Hahn Garden, Greenhouse Classroom
Class Limit: 15
Cost: $35
Materials fee: $15
Instructor(s): Stephanie Huckestein

Plant Propagation is a process of creating new plants through a variety of techniques. Participants will learn the principles and practices of propagation. We will focus mostly on herbaceous plants but will also briefly cover propagation of trees and shrubs. The course will include many hands-on practices in the Hahn Garden and greenhouse.

Register for Courses

October 4 - November 15, 2018

Founding Principles of the American Regime

Course #: 100290-020
Time: Thursday, 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Dates: 6 weeks: Oct. 4, 11, 18, Nov. 1, 8, 15 (no class Oct. 25)
Location: VT Public Safety Building, Room 153
Class Limit: 32
Cost: $35
Instructor(s): Sidney "Al" Pearson

How much do the founding principles of the American regime continue to animate political debates? Are the principles expressed in the Declaration of Independence and the Federalist Papers being undermined today?

What prompts this approach is the wealth of books that openly interpret contemporary politics in apocalyptic, fascist terms. Passions are aroused— never a good perspective for serious analysis. In these times, let's go back to the Founders and Alexis de Tocqueville for a more sober perspective.

REQUIRED READING
Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison. The Federalist.

Register for Courses

September 27 - November 15, 2018

The Supreme Court and the Criminal Process

Course #: 100290-021
Time: Thursday, 3:00 - 4:30 p.m.
Dates: 6 weeks: Sept. 27, Oct. 4, 18, Nov 1, 8, 15 (no class Oct. 11, 25)
Location: VT Public Safety Building, Room 153
Class Limit: 32
Cost: $35
Instructor(s): Jack Call

This course will cover a number of constitutional issues relating to the process that takes place when a person has been arrested, charged, tried, and sentenced.

TOPICS

  • The law of interrogations—the constitutional rules that regulate the manner in which the police may interrogate persons suspected of a crime
  • The law regulating the arrests of suspects
  • Issues that commonly arise through motions made by the defense prior to trial
  • The constitutional rights to a speedy trial, a jury trial, and against double jeopardy
  • Basic rules affecting the sentencing process
  • Appeals and petitions for a writ of habeas corpus

Register for Courses

FRIDAY

October 5 - November 9, 2018

Watercolor with Jesi

Course #: 100290-022
Time: Friday, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Dates: 6 weeks: Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26, Nov. 2, 9
Location: Blacksburg Community Center, Community Room
Class Limit: 15
Cost: $35
Materials fee: $35
Instructor(s): Jesi Pace-Berkeley

Would you like to learn more watercolor tips, techniques and solutions in the supportive atmosphere of other painters? Have you ever wanted to know how to make your paintings have a unique "voice " that is yours and yours alone? Do you have questions about watercolor methods and materials? composition? color use?

In this class we will explore a variety of painting subjects as we explore both historic and contemporary examples that relate to six areas of focus. Among the topics this class may include are: fundamentals of concept and composition; opaque, transparent and mixed media; working full vs. limited value; creating mood; hard / soft edge; full vs. limited color; four basic wash techniques; mastering positive and negative painting; creating interest and movement; directing the viewer using repetition with variety; creating unity with color temperature; taking creative risk; experimenting, creative techniques, and helpful hints.

The six classes will include individual instruction and class critique. All levels of experience are welcome if you have a "can do" attitude!

SUPPLIES
A list of supplies will be distributed in advance or at the first class meeting.

Register for Courses

October 12 - November 2, 2018

Facebook for Beginners

Course #: 100290-023
Time: Friday, 9:00 - 10:30 a.m.
Dates: 4 weeks: Oct. 12, 19, 26, Nov. 2
Location: Corporate Research Center, 1880 Pratt Drive, Suite 2018
Class Limit: 10
Cost: $35
Instructor(s): Heidi Dickens

This short course introduces new users to the basics of Facebook (or current users who are looking for a little guidance). The four sessions serve as a primer to get any Facebook newbie up to speed. Come with a Facebook account, a device that connects to the internet (laptop, tablet, mobile smart phone), and a patient playful attitude. This is a "how to and hands-on" course. You will need to set up a basic Facebook account prior to session 1; instructions will be provided.

CLASS SESSIONS

  1. Explain Facebook: common Facebook terms and features, navigation and layout, accessing Facebook via browser vs. app, and where Facebook fits in with other social media platforms; uploading pictures; your Facebook profile
  2. Use Facebook: find people and pages; share and connect through status updates; commenting, liking, tagging, and private messaging. Privacy, following/unfollowing a page or person, good Facebook etiquette
  3. Take control of Facebook: account settings, preferences, the Facebook newsfeed. How to deactivate or delete your Facebook account
  4. Explore Facebook: pages, groups, and events, Facebook help

MATERIALS
Device that connects to the internet (preferably a laptop, but a tablet and/or mobile phone will work) and a Facebook account. Participant should bring all their portable devices to experience Facebook via browser and app.

Register for Courses

October 5 - November 9, 2018

Novels of Marilynne Robinson, Part Two

Course #: 100290-024
Time:Friday, 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Dates: 6 weeks: Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26, Nov. 2, 9
Location: Hillel at Virginia Tech
Class Limit: 16
Cost: $35
Instructor(s): Tom Gardner

Marilynne Robinson is one of our most important contemporary novelists. Her work is lyrically beautiful, dense with thought, and deeply engaged. Her novels are the sort that people fall in love with and give to their closest friends. We will be looking at her two most recent novels, Home (2008) and Lila (2014). This course is a follow-up to an LLI course in Fall 2017 in which we looked at Robinson's first two novels, Housekeeping and Gilead, but you need not have taken that course or read those two earlier novels to be able to fully engage these two recent novels. All are welcome!

In class, we will look closely at key passages, unfolding the way the central characters of each novel make sense of the world, and thinking about the way these two novels respond to the world's almost incomprehensible beauty and fragility. During our first class, Tom will briefly summarize Robinson's novel Gilead, which these two new novels revisit in surprising and eye-opening ways.

REQUIRED READING
Marilynne Robinson, Home and Lila (Picador Press). Please read the first 70 pages of Home before the first class.

Register for Courses


Share this site.





Continuing & Professional Education @ Virginia Tech